[Video Review] Multi-Purpose Belt: The Tybelt

More Than A Belt

“It’s a belt. Well, it’s not a belt. No it is a belt, but it’s more than a belt.”

That’s how SurvivalMike begins his video review of the Tybelt Pro Ultimate Multi-Purpose Belt.

This BBM product (made in France) is an actual trouser belt that’s rated to support 4,850 pounds. Yes, 2.43 tons.

Created for use both in open and closed configurations when mountaineering and rock climbing, this belt can be used in other situations:

  • as a tether strap,
  • as rescue equipment,
  • as a harness, and
  • for securing equipment to bikes and packs

Belt Review Video On The Next Page

3 Rules For Your Survival Food

Basic Prepper Food Rules

The End Of The World As We Know It.

It doesn’t matter how we got here. Things are bad all about us and hopefully we prepared well. The Eater website interviewed several dedicated preppers including Pat Henry of the Prepper Journal and Lisa Bedford, the Survival Mom.

Survival Food Rules

There are essentially three basic prepper food rules that that will substantially increase your survival odds. This not new territory, but a good reminder of how you should be organizing and executing your food storage prep.

Bedford also offers additional insights on her 3-layer pantry storage strategy: from the grocery store, bulk items, and ready-to-eat.

The Three Rules:

Rule One: Keep Your Groceries Hidden

Though preppers are very active behind screen names on the Internet — on groups like the American Preppers Network or websites like the Survival Blog — they stay under the radar in real life. It’s not because they think their hobby is strange, but because when the end of the world comes, they don’t want the entire starving neighborhood to know that their house is the one full of potable water, heat, and enough food to last a full calendar year. ”

The first rule of prep club is you don’t talk about prep club,” says Lisa Bedford, a mother of two teenagers and a prepper also known as the Survival Mom. As a result, there’s not much in the way of hands-on education. “The community is online because people want to be very careful and cautious about who they talk to,” Bedford explains. Bedford says that she has cultivated a small group of neighboring preppers who she could rely on if SHTF (“shit hits the fan,” naturally). “But I have no idea how much they actually have.”

Rule Two: Don’t Store What You Can’t Eat

The main issue is that stored food is only as useful as your willingness to eat it. “Food fatigue is a real thing,” Bedford explains. If all that’s in the pantry is rice and beans, the monotony of the diet would eventually make anyone lose their desire to eat.

To get a varied diet, Bedford advocates a three-layer approach to stocking the pantry.

The first layer takes place at the grocery store — specifically in the canned food aisles. “The reason canned food is so important is that it’s shelf stable,” Bedford says. That said, don’t just purchase whatever is on sale. “Focus on things you’ll eat and your family members will eat,” she adds. And don’t forget the spices: Adding new flavors to the same base ingredients is an easy way to combat food fatigue while sticking to a few pantry staples.

Next are the bulk foods which Bedford believes are where most of a prepper’s time and money should be spent. Opening a can of ravioli might get you a meal, but there’s not much in the way of choice. With freeze-dried meat, shrimp, yogurt, and cheese (almost every food seems to have been freeze-dried) and a healthy stockpile of various pastas, dried beans, and grain, “you can make hundreds of recipes,” according to Bedford.

For people who don’t feel up to DIY recipe development, there are a number of resources to turn to. Many preppers blog and post individual recipes and tips on their websites. Prepping is also a (small) cookbook genre with titles like The Survivalist Cookbook or The Prepper’s Cookbook that speak directly to their intended audience. Plenty of other cookbooks focus on things like canned soup, jerky, or campfire recipes.

Finally, a good prepper wants to invest in some ready-to-eat meals. They’re not all that different from the field rations given to soldiers and, as a result, are not something the average person wants to survive on entirely. “You’ll get tired of them pretty quickly,” Bedford says. She recommends that the RTE meals comprise no more than 20 percent of total food supplies.

Rule Three: Get Out of the Pantry

Unfortunately even the best-stocked food supply doesn’t last forever. Bedford points out that food storage doesn’t exist in a vacuum. “You’ll open that can of beans and then what?” she says. “The purpose of stored food is to buy you time.”

In her family’s case, the year or so their supply could carry them for would be enough time to connect with other families, work together, barter, and so on. “Right now if there was a massive power grid failure, millions of households would only have a couple weeks of food,” she explains. “They have no margin.”

Henry supports the idea of keeping chickens both for meat and eggs as well as investing in the time to learn about technology like aquaponics or even hydroponics, which can both create comparatively large amounts of food in small spaces.

Surprisingly, he doesn’t advocate relying too much on hunting. “If you’re out there looking for food and things are that bad, chances are hundreds and thousands of other people are doing the same thing.” There are only so many deer and pheasants to go around.

Source:  Another great and insightful article by Tove Danovich, a freelance journalist based in NYC.

Image:  PublicDomainPictures

 

 

[Video] Building A Ladder With Rope And Poles

How To Build A Ladder In The Forest

You’re in the forest and you want to cache items in a tree to keep them from humans, bears, etc. Or you want to reach a platform already built … or maybe harvest an animal burrow.

Since no one carries a ladder for gear, you have to make one. And that’s what this video is about: making a ladder quickly and easily.

setting up ladder poles

Setting Ladder Poles

[Any survival skill is “quick and easy” if you practice it. Listen to the comments at the 3:00 mark.]

Basically, in addition to your knife and/or saw, you need:

Post And VIDEO Continued On Page 2

Prepping Your Car For An Emergency Escape

Prep List For Your Car

Unless you already live at your bug out location, you’re going to need a vehicle to get you and your family there … wherever or whatever there is.

serpentine road

No Excuses For Not Being Prepared

I assume you keep the vehicle you would use for this emergency response in good repair. You follow basic car maintenance timetables, and any issues are immediately resolved. Making an appointment with your mechanic when the SHTF is not a good preparedness option.

And if you’re proficient with car repairs, you have a tool kit stashed in the vehicle.

Below we list both car prep survival gear and safe travel plans … including the always important Plan B.

Enjoy and Share

Prepping your Car – Repair Kit

 … When it comes to prepping your car you should consider the following for your repair kit:

  • A spare tire
  • A tire repair kit
  • Jack and tire iron
  • Gravel, sand or kitty litter that can be used for traction on icy road spots
  • A box of extra fuses
  • Duct tape
  • Hose clamps
  • Road Flares
  • A collapsible or multi-use shovel
  • Snow brush and ice scraper
  • Floodlight
  • Windshield washer fluid
  • Oil and engine coolant (the type recommended for your vehicle)
  • Jumper cables
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Pry bar
  • Empty gas can, siphon, and funnel (you will have to scavenge for fuel at some time)

These items are a minimum for prepping your car and you should consider getting them …

Prepping your Car – Emergency Kit

Besides a repair kit, every car should have an emergency kit. The good news is that you can use your bug out bag for that. Your bug out bag should include most of the items needed for an emergency if you’ve done your homework.

Think about adding these items when prepping your car:

  • Water and food depending on the number of your family members
  • Energy bars
  • Waterproof matches
  • Hot packs
  • Sunscreen and insect repellent in summer
  • A small compact medi-kit
  • Light sticks
  • Road flares
  • Collapsible stove and fuel canister
  • Aluminum foil
  • Water filter
  • Small pan
  • Unbreakable cup or mug
  • Hand cranked radio
  • Flashlight (a hand cranked or solar rechargeable one)
  • Whistle
  • A few heavy-duty trash bags
  • Wool blankets
  • A tarp
  • A paracord
  • Rain ponchos
  • A cell phone
  • A GPS system
  • Baby supplies, if you have a young child (diapers, baby food, and so on)
  • Pet supplies
  • A few distraction items (something to keep the kids busy …)
  • Make sure to add an extra set of clothing for each family member … ( … gear that can be used for all types of weather)
  • One or more protection items of your choice (firearms, crossbow, stun gun, knife, etc.)

More Details On Page 2

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