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How to Hide Your Wilderness Garden

It’s Your Survival Garden

You’re growing a survival garden for you, for your family, and for your group.

You do not want this wilderness garden to be out in the open for any “passerby”, hungry or not, to spot. Hiding your garden may be very important.

garden next to pond

Hidden Garden Near Pond

What to do? How can you hide it in “plain sight”?

Hiding Your Survival Garden Continued On PAGE 2

Growing A Self-Sustaining Food Forest Part 2

Self-Sustaining Food Forest

In Part 1 of this Prepper Recon Podcast, David the Good shared his ideas on creating a self-sustaining, self-perpetuating forest type of garden. Essentially, a food forest.

forest garden

Sustainable Forest Garden

In part 2, the discussion focuses on composting, sandy soil, and growing spinach:

  • the difficulties of composting in sandy soil (at the 2 minute mark, 2:00)
  • the correct Carbon [“brown stuff”] to Nitrogen [“green stuff”] mix (2:59)
  • using chickens as your composting “farmhands” (9:10)
  • why you should start gardening immediately (11:50)
  • about David’s books, videos and his survival garden blog (15:30)
  • an important thought on seeds, and why composting may prevent your family from starving (17:25)
  • and, finally, growing different kinds of spinach (19:20)

Here’s The VIDEO

 

 

How To Grow A Self-Sustaining Food Forest

Growing A Food Forest

The idea is to create a self-sustaining, self-perpetuating forest type of garden, a food forest. Once established (a long-term proposition), this edible ecosystem takes care of itself: no annual tilling of the soil, no planting of seeds, and no daily “farming chores”.

mushroom

Food Forest

On this Prepper Recon Podcast, David the Good discusses how you study the existing layers of your local forests: the tall and medium size trees, the shrubs and vines, and the underground growth.

These layers provide insights into what this forest habitat can naturally sustain, the fruits, nuts, berries, tubers, etc.

Once established this forest garden could provide edible crops for decades or longer. You could never walk away from a field of sweet corn and expect a crop next year.

But you could return to your food forest after a long absence, sit in the shade and enjoy a meal. Or so David says.

Listen how Mother Nature becomes your most reliable farmhand:

 

 

Image:  Anja Osenberg